My Prison Studio

As a member of a Federal works program in the ‘80’s, I taught art in community centers in and around Dayton, Ohio. My fellow teachers were performers, musicians, and artists of all types. The director himself was a dancer and leader of a troupe when not directing us. Artists rotated weekly to the centers, usually in pairs, sometimes alone.…

In the Studio 3/17/13

Poor light yesterday, Saturday, but good light today. The lake came alive this week and although it’s cold–mid-30’s–the waves and whitecaps already  remind me of summer. Here’s a shot of some of the things I worked on today. I finished the drawing of the larger one and decided to plunge ahead and start the under-painting.…

In the Studio 3/10/2013

With the temperatures near 70, it felt like Spring. What a difference a week makes! Keith got his baseball stuff out and John and I went to the marina to inspect the Betty Jane. All boats are still in dry dock, of course, but we were not the only ones inspecting their boat. The ice…

In the Studio 3/3/2013

The light was poor this morning but improved as the day worn on; eventually the sun made an appearance.  March has been an extension of February which was an extension of January–in other words, it’s been non-stop winter. This photo was taken early this morning. The lake looks like a stretch of Siberian tundra. Got…

Lawrence’s Annoying Paintings at the Cleveland Museum of Art

I have nothing against Thomas Lawrence, indeed, I like his work, but—good grief!—he could make some annoying paintings. The Cleveland Museum of Art has two of the offending paintings hanging side-by-side. Lawrence (died 1830) had well-earned success throughout his life. A prodigy, he found success early and later became President of the Royal Academy. He…

Thumbs-up: Neel, Thumbs-up (also): Pearlstein

By happenstance or cunning plan, The Cleveland Museum of Art has two large paintings hanging next to each other by artists of whom I am fond– Alice Neel and Philip Pearlstein. Juxtaposed this way, the relative merits of each can be studied. Except for a long detour in the Picasso Amusement Park, a straight line…

Tips for Using a Grid

I frequently use a grid to enlarge designs for paintings. It’s my preferred method for transferring designs from one medium into another (except watercolors). What do I use to create a grid? Good question. The grid should be visible enough to see—doh!—and not  easily rub away, but not so visible that it appears in the…

Transferring Designs to Canvas

I routinely transfer designs as I rework subjects in various mediums. There are several standard methods for transferring designs to a target surface. One long-used method was to prepare a cartoon to the exact dimensions of the target wall or canvas. Once the design was fixed, it would be transferred by one of the following methods: Covering…